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for example, by works o n tourism as play (McCanne ll , 1976), television as play (Stephenson, 1967), daydreaming as play (Caughey, 1984), sexual intimacy as play (Betcher, IQ87), and even gossip as play (Spack, 1986). Page 3”

As the categories that apply human conscience can not be made into a dispensary of Brave New World actions, the principle of leasure and play is to create a life in which allows you to receive the benefits that can be experienced at the time than creating illusion distancing one from what can be experienced . Television and sexual intimacy aren’t even comparable as one creates energy of life, while the other one asks and nothing is received.


The rhetorical play as fate (Chapter 4) is usually applied to gambling and games of chance, and it contrasts totally with the prior rhetoric. It is probably the oldest of all of the rhetoric’s, resting as it does on the belief that human lives and play are controlled by destiny, by the gods, by atoms or neurons, or by luck, but very little by ourselves, except perhaps through the skillful use of magic or astrology Pg 10

Tangibility is such an important factor in which people make decisions, find opportunities, and establish space. A dice game is used for some one who wishes to gain a prestige among others to gain an ego or hold oneself above others because they believe they hold a special skill. But deception comes to truth in the form of a gain because to some degree compition is completely simulated of ones self to themselves and to others,

Sidney

  • "since about 1800 in Western society, intellectuals of various kinds have talked more or less systematically and more or less scientifically about play, and have discovered that they have immense problems in conceptualizing it."
  • "Finally there are the ambiguities that seem particularly problem­atic in Western society, such as why play is seen largely as what children do but not what adults do; why children play but adults only recreate; why play is said to be important for children's growth but is merely a diversion for adults."

The value of play is often devised among the areas of scholarship. Other articles of play theory have supported or explored the idea that forms of play or more valuable than others. Sutton's rhetoric explore the areas of play and how show themselves in Western society. I feel that exploring the contrasts between different forms of play is more useful than deciding which is more productive to an individual. - Intrinsic: player's motives - Extrinsic: how the play serves the larger culture

Nessa

  • “The concept of līlā not only brings together many forms of "play" that emerge and develop throughout human history - game play, dance, sport, erotic play, roleplay, and sacred ritual, it also underscores the disruption-as-creation theme in discussions of play activity. For, as Huizinga argues, whatever play is, it is not dead mechanism.”
  • “This figure of play emphasizes the significance of aesthetic experience and embodiment, an emphasis that is re-emerging within video game culture by the incorporation of new controllers and sensors that place the body at the center of experience (as opposed to just the hands) and extend traditional "gameplay" to include what game designer Steve Swink refers to as "game feel" and "virtual sensation."
  • What about play, can be inherently spiritual? Even though we seem to naturally go towards play, and physical experiences, our society pushes the opposite. How can we combat this/how did this western concept of play even come about? It's very interesting that in most Pagan religions the "head" god or goddess is usually playful, and posses the qualities of a regular human. However in most monotheistic and abrahamic religions paint their god as being more of a silent dictator than someone you could connect with.

Caiti

  • "Michio Kaku discusses Einstein's famous comment that "God doesn't play dice with the universe" by way of Newtonian physics and the notion of determinism."

I found Einstein's comment intriguing, as many other gods are known to "play" with the universe, or at least the people living within it.I kind of interpreted it as "something so serious couldn't have been made by play" or something along those lines. 'Play' can almost always be looked down upon in the workplace. Do you think adding more play could improve upon the status-quo? Or would it still be seen as distracting?

Fiona

  • "The rhetoric: of play as fate (Chapter 4) is usually applied to gambling and games of chance, and it contrasts totally with the prior rhetoric. It is probably the oldest of all of the rhetorics, resting as it does on the belief that human lives and play are controlled by destiny, by the gods, by atoms or neurons, or by luck, but very little by ourselves, except perhaps through the skillful use of magic or astrology. This rhetoric enjoys only an underground advocacy in the modern world. It is no longer a widespread and conscious value system among the intellectual elites, though it remains popular among lower socioeconomic groups. It contrasts most strongly also with those modern theories of leisure that argue that the distinguishing feature of play is that it is an exercise of free choice." (The Ambiguity of Play, pp10)
  • Horoscopes/astrology - What category of play does this fall under?
  • Why does play have to be random? If a god is recklessly throwing dice around, how specific is the effect of the way they land? How concrete? Is human play the defiance of the roll of the dice?